Parsnip Gnocchi with Sprouts, Sage & Hazelnuts

Making gnocchi from scratch is a little intimidating, but it’s actually not that complicated. Simply mix puréed, seasoned vegetables with enough flour to form a soft dough, roll the dough into snakes and cut into bites. Then boil the bites until they rise to the surface and you are ready to sauté, roast or simmer them in sauce. This parsnip variety is ridiculously delicious. Give it Christmassy vibes with sprouts, sage and hazelnuts.

Liz x

Ingredients (serves 4)

For the gnocchi:

  • 500g parsnips, boiled/steamed until soft
  • 2 tsp salt and a grind of pepper
  • 250g flour (plus more as needed for dusting and rolling)

To finish:

  • lots of butter (to sauté the gnocchi in batches)
  • around 20 Brussels sprouts, quartered
  • a handful of hazelnuts, chopped
  • fresh sage leaves
  • salt and pepper to taste

Method

  1. Mash the cooked parsnips until smooth. If they are a little stringy or you left the skins on, use a blender to get them very smooth. Stir in the salt and pepper and taste. They should be over-seasoned at this stage before you add the flour.
  2. Tip in the flour and use a spoon to roughly combine it with the pureed parsnips. Then tip out onto a floured surface and bring together into a soft dough. Don’t give in to the temptation to knead, you are not looking for stretchy gluten in gnocchi, you want a tender dough.
  3. Cut the dough into smaller pieces and roll into slim snakes. Use flour as needed to help avoid stickiness. Then cut the snakes into little bites and spread them out on a floured tray. If you feel up for some kitchen meditation time, you could roll each bite over a gnocchi board or the back of a fork to create beautiful grooves, but it’s not necessary.
  4. Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil and drop the gnocchi in in batches. After just a few minutes, they should start to rise to the top, scoop them out with a slotted spoon a place on a large platter. Keep going until you have boiled all the gnocchi.
  5. Heat up a large frying pan with a generous tbsp of butter. Add half the sprouts and season with salt and pepper. Sauté for 3 minutes until they start to colour. Then add half the gnocchi, half the hazelnuts and around 6 sage leaves. Add another tbsp or so of butter and stir fry to warm up the gnocchi and give it some golden colour. The nuts should get wonderfully toasted and the sage leaves impart gorgeous fragrance and flavour.
  6. Tumble into two warm bowls to serve and repeat step 5 with the other half of the ingredients. Enjoy!

Mushroom, Parsnip & Potato Gratin

This creamy, comforting, warm winter side dish will make you cosy from the inside out. It’s special enough for the Christmas table, but once you try it, you’ll be making it to go alongside all your winter roasts. Deep, dark, earthy mushrooms mingle perfectly with sweet parsnips and rich cream. The nutmeg, garlic and bay leaves infuse beautifully into the sauce making your whole house smell amazing!

Liz x

Ingredients

  • 250g fresh mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled & sliced
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 600g potatoes, thinly sliced
  • 600g parsnips, thinly sliced
  • 1 tbsp dried mushrooms (soaked in 400ml boiling water)
  • 1 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 400ml cream (oat cream works well)
  • salt & pepper to taste

Method

  1. Turn your oven on to 200C and prepare all your ingredients. Boil a kettle and cover a tbsp of dried mushrooms with 400ml of just-boiled water. Find a large, oven and hob safe pot with a lid (or use a large soup pot on the stove and decant to an oven dish to bake).
  2. Sauté the sliced fresh mushrooms for 5 minutes with the oil, garlic and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Once soft add the potatoes and parsnips to the pan.
  3. Pour the mushroom stock (including all the now rehydrated mushrooms) over the vegetables. Add the bay leaves & nutmeg and season well with salt and pepper. Carefully stir to combine the ingredients, then level out with the back of the spoon.
  4. Pour over the cream then pop the lid onto the pot and simmer for around 8-10 minutes until the vegetables are just soft. Remove the lid, use the back of the spoon to push all the veg under the liquid. Taste and add more seasoning if needed.
  5. Place the dish in the oven for 20-30 minutes to brown and reduce into a gorgeous gratin. Allow the dish to sit out and set for 5 minutes before serving in generous scoops. Enjoy!

Curried Parsnip, Leek and Lentil Soup

This is a real hearty seasonal soup. My organic veg box was delivered this morning (Fri) and seeing the earthy parsnips just made me smile because I only live 15km from where they were pulled from the ground! #buylocalproduce Parsnips and leeks are at their very best in autumn.

Leeks and parsnips are two of my favourite vegetables. I usually keep the flavours simple but couldn’t resist adding lentils and curry to make this soup a substantial meal.

The best part of this soup is that it only has a handful of ingredients, make it as spicy as you like and serve it with big generous chunks of organic sourdough bread.

Lou 🙂

Ingredients:

  • 700g parsnips
  • 2 small leeks (or one large)
  • 3-4 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon of turmeric
  • good pinch salt and pepper
  • 1.5 litres water or stock
  • 400g tin lentils
  • 1 tablespoon oil

Method

  1. Grab a wide pot with a lid.
  2. Scrub and dice the parsnips. Theres no need to peel them when they are organic, just wash them well.
  3. Wash the leeks, cut the root off and most of the hard green tops. (These can be used for veg stock #zerofoodwaste
  4. Slice the leeks finely.
  5. Warm the pot on the hob, low to medium heat and add a tablespoon of light oil.
  6. Tip in the sliced leeks. Add a generous pinch of salt and pepper and cook down for a few minutes.
  7. Add in the curry powder and turmeric and cook to toast and awaken the spices for a minute or two. (Add a splash of water if its catching on the bottom of the pot)
  8. Next toss in the diced parsnips and stir them through the leeks.
  9. Pour in the water and pop the lid on if you have one.
  10. Let the soup simmer on the hob for about 40 minutes, the soup is ready when the parsnips are soft when squished with the back of a wooden spoon.
  11. While it’s cooking away. Open the tin of lentils and drain and rinse them.
  12. If you like chunky soup just add in the lentils now, but if you like a smoother soup blend first and then add the lentils.
  13. Check the seasoning and serve with crusty organic sourdough if you have some.

Oven Baked Parsnip & Hazelnut Risotto

Bake your next risotto in the oven to save yourself from standing over the stove and constantly stirring a pot. I promise, the results are just as delicious. We are obsessed with this parsnip and hazelnut version right now as the new season parsnips are just being pulled from the ground. Hazelnuts and parsnips are a match made in heaven and the rosemary in the recipe really rounds off the flavours. Did you know we stock organic risotto rice and hazelnuts (and many more great groceries) in clever compostable bags?

Liz x

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1 onion, diced
  • 3 sticks of celery, diced
  • 400g parsnips, diced
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 250g risotto rice
  • 600ml water, just boiled
  • 200ml white wine
  • 2 stock cubes
  • 3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp chopped rosemary
  • 100g hazelnuts, chopped

Method

  1. Turn your oven on to 200C and find a deep baking or casserole dish with a lid. Put the parsnips, onion and celery in the dish along with the oil and butter. Season well with salt and pepper, give it a mix and bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until the veg is soft.
  2. Meanwhile, in a heat-proof bowl, measure out the rice and top with the just-boiled water, stock cubes, garlic and rosemary. Stir to dissolve the stock cubes and then add the glass of white wine. Let the rice soak while the veg cooks in the oven.
  3. Remove the dish from the oven and pour in the rice and all the liquid it has been soaking in. Stir to combine the rice, stock and vegetables and then put the lid on the dish. Place the dish back into the oven to bake the rice. It should take around 20-30 minutes. Check on it after 20, when the rice has absorbed the liquid, it is done.
  4. Once the rice is cooked, remove the lid and stir, add a splash more wine or water to stop it from drying out, then top with the chopped hazelnuts and return to the oven with the lid off for just 5 minutes or so to toast the nuts. Serve in warm bowls and enjoy!

Parsnip Tarte Tatin

A tarte tatin is traditionally made with apples as a dessert, but we love making savoury versions too. It’s a great way to showcase a seasonal vegetable and make it the star of your meal. The result looks fancy and tastes amazing, but the secret is it is sooo easy to do. Serve with some fresh salad and a zingy dressing, with some cheese, nuts, seeds or beans scattered on top for a little protein and you’ve got a wonderful, balanced, plant based meal ready to share with friends or family.

Liz x

Ingredients (serves 6 -8 depending on sides)

  • 50g butter (we love our new Naturli vegan butter) – chopped into small pieces
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 2 tsp thyme leaves (fresh or dried)
  • black pepper to taste
  • 2 large parsnips sliced into finger sized wedges (enough to tightly cover the base of your dish)
  • a sheet of puff pastry (check the ingredients, many are made dairy free now – or make your own)

Method

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 200C and find a large, round oven proof dish. Or you can use a square/rectangular dish too of course, anything that your sheet of pastry will fit in comfortably.
  2. Dot half the butter around in the base of your dish. Drizzle over half the olive oil and then evenly sprinkle the sugar, half the salt, half the thyme and a good grind of black pepper.
  3. Arrange the slices of parsnips over the butter and seasoning. Aim for complete coverage and one tight layer.
  4. Dot over the remaining butter and drizzle the oil, sprinkle the rest of the salt, thyme and another grind of pepper.
  5. Place the dish in the oven until the parsnips are soft and starting to caramelise. This should take around 30 minutes but keep an eye on them as ovens vary.
  6. Remove from the oven then quickly and carefully place the sheet of pastry over the hot parsnips and put the dish back in the oven right away.
  7. After 15 minutes or so, the pastry should be risen and golden brown. Remove the dish from the oven and place a large, heat proof plate or chopping board over the dish.
  8. Then use oven gloves to carefully, but very quickly, flip the plate/board and dish over. Still using gloves, pick the now upside down dish up off the plate/board and you should be left with a beautiful parsnip tarte tatin!
  9. Slice and serve whilst still warm with salads. It’s delicious cold too, so if you have any leftovers, eat for lunch the next day.

Spiced Parsnip, Hazelnut & Pear Loaf

This loaf has everything I love in a cake. Great texture (thanks to the grated parsnips), not too sweet, lovely fruity bursts from the pear slices and it’s deliciously nutty and spiced, perfect with a hot mug of tea on a chilly Autumn afternoon! I hope you enjoy it as much as I am enjoying it right now. You’ll need a food processor to grind your linseeds and hazelnuts, and a grater for the parsnips, but apart from that it’s a pretty straightforward, one bowl cake.

Liz x

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp flaxseeds, ground into flour in a small food processor
  • 1 tsp each: ground cinnamon, ginger and cardamom (or use mixed spice?)
  • a pinch of salt
  • 150ml vegetable oil
  • 250ml oat milk (or any milk you like eg hazelnut)
  • 200g sugar
  • 250g hazelnuts, ground into a rough flour in a food processor
  • 250g plain flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 250g parsnips, grated
  • 2 large pears

Method

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 175C and line a large (or two small) loaf tin with baking parchment.
  2. Mix the ground flaxseeds, spices, salt, oil, milk and sugar in a large mixing bowl and let it sit while you grind the hazelnuts and grate the parsnips. This time will allow the flaxseeds to absorb some liquid and turn ‘eggy’.
  3. Tip the ground hazelnuts, flour, baking powder and bicarb into the mixing bowl and fold it into the wet ingredients. Don’t over-mix! Just fold it in until it’s fairly well incorporated.
  4. Then fold in the grated parsnip. You should now have a spoonable, thick batter.
  5. Peel the pears and cut them lengthways into quarters. Cut out the cores then cut the quarters into long slices.
  6. Spoon half the batter into the lined loaf tin. Arrange half the pear slices on top, then spoon over the rest of the batter. Smooth it out and place the other half of the pear slices on top. Sprinkle with a few pinches of sugar if you like, then place the tin in the middle of the oven to bake.
  7. Depending on your oven and the size of your loaf tin, this cake should take roughly 90 minutes to bake. Check it at 40 minutes in, then check on it every 15 minute or so after that. It will still be deliciously moist inside because of the pear slices and parsnip, but not wet. You can test it with a skewer. When it’s done to your liking, allow it to cool in the tin. Then carefully move it to a chopping board and enjoy in thick slices with a hot cuppa!

Warm Winter Salad

Sometimes in winter, you need a break from all the soups, stews and pies and want something fresh and vibrant. A warm winter salad is the answer. This is less of a recipe and more of a suggestion. I make versions of this fairly regularly and always make more than enough so that we have leftovers for packed lunches.


Simply chop up some winter veg into similar sized pieces (squash, onion, parsnips, cauliflower, carrots, mushrooms, beetroot…), pop them into a roasting tray with a little olive oil salt and pepper. Mix and roast at 200C until slightly charred and soft – this takes around 20-30 minutes depending on how much veg you roast.

Then pile onto some beautiful bitter leaves and dress. A creamy, tahini dressing goes really well here. Mix a couple of tbsp of tahini with a pinch of salt, a tsp maple syrup, 2 tbsp of lemon juice and two tbsp cold water. Once the dressing is well mixed it should be beautifully creamy and pourable. Taste it for seasoning and add more lemon or salt as needed. You can even pimp it up with some crushed garlic or finely chopped herbs like parsley or coriander. Then drizzle it all over the roasted veg.

Sprinkle over some crunchy, fragrant dukka (see my parsnip and pear soup recipe for that) and some sweet little pomegranate seeds. Those jewel-like seeds make everything more festive and are the perfect sweet and sour foil to the nutty, rich dressing. Enjoy!



Parsnip & Pear Soup

Parsnip & Pear Soup with Hazelnut Dukka

This soup is very simple, but delicately sophisticated. I would say it’s even good enough for the festive table! Parsnips and pears are a match made in heaven and I think you’ll agree that my hazelnut dukka really makes the dish sing. The spiced, toasty crunch of dukka offsets the sweetness of the parsnips and pears, and a little drizzle of peppery extra virgin oil rounds off the bowl.


Ingredients (serves 4 as a starter)

  • 1 tbsp olive oil (plus extra for drizzling)
  • 1 knob of butter
  • the white part of a leek – rinsed and roughly chopped
  • 1 scrubbed and trimmed parsnip – roughly chopped
  • 2 small pears – quartered and cored
  • salt to taste
  • pinch of ground nutmeg (optional)
  • hazelnut dukka (see recipe below)

Method

In a pot, gently soften the leeks, parsnip and pear with the olive oil, butter and a pinch of salt. Once the vegetables start to soften and wilt down, just cover them with water and simmer until the parsnips are cooked through. Then blend the soup until very smooth with a handheld stick blender (or let it cool down and blend in a food processor). Taste for seasoning and add more salt and a fragrant pinch of nutmeg if you like (this just makes it extra festive). Serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a sprinkle of hazelnut dukka.

Hazelnut Dukka

Dukka is an Egyptian nut and spice blend which is absolutely delicious. You’ll be hooked once you try it so it’s worth learning to make your own. My version is fairly simple to make.

I find an empty jar that I want to store it in and half fill it with hazelnuts. Walnuts or mixed nuts are great too. Then toast the nuts (for hazelnuts, I do this in a tray in a hot oven – just keep an eye on them and give the tray a shake every now and then so that they toast evenly – it should only take around 10 minutes).

Then tip the hazelnuts onto a clean tea towel on your work surface, place another tea towel on top and rub your hands quite firmly on the tea towel and the skins will just flake off. Then pick out the skinned and toasted hazelnuts and chop them with a large, sharp knife and put them in the jar.

The rest of the jar space should be taken up with toasted sesame, cumin and coriander seeds in fairly equal proportions. I just eyeball it and toast these one at a time in a dry frying pan, or altogether in the oven. I like to bash up the toasted coriander seeds a bit with a pestle and mortar first.

Then give the jar a shake to mix up the ingredients, let it cool completely with the lid off before popping the jar on your shelf to use on lots of different dishes. Your dukka should stay fresh for at least a month.

Did you make this soup? Let us know how it went in the comments and feel free to share the recipe with your friends and family. Share photos of our recipes on the Green Earth Organics Healthy Eating Facebook page or tag us @greenearthorganics1 over on Instagram. We love to see our recipes leave the page! Liz x